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Tracing Out Capital Flows: How Financially Integrated Banks Respond to Natural Disasters


Multi-market banks reallocate capital when local credit demand increases after natural disasters. Following such events, credit in unaffected but connected markets declines by about 50 cents per dollar of additional lending in shocked areas, but most of the decline comes from loans in areas where banks do not own branches. Moreover, banks increase sales of more-liquid loans in order to lessen the impact of the demand shock on credit supply. Larger, multi-market banks appear better able than smaller ones to shield credit supplied to their core markets (those with branches) by aggressively cutting back lending outside those markets.

Keywords: Financial Integration, Branch Banking, Securitization.

JEL Codes: G20, G21.


Suggested citation: Cortés, Kristle, and Philip E. Strahan, “Tracing Out Capital Flows: How Financially Integrated Banks Respond to Natural Disasters,” Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, Working Paper no. 14-12.

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