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Proceedings


2008

The Economics of Geography: Cities, Growth, and Economic Development


Why do some cities thrive while others struggle? That was the question considered by more than 140 civic and business leaders, researchers, educators, and economic development professionals who gathered at the Economics of Geography: Cities, Growth, and Economic Development conference, hosted by the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. The first day, economic researchers looked at “big picture” issues such as the relationship between IT adoption and the education level of a city’s workforce; the gentrification of urban centers; the role of cities as idea generators; the relationship between new plant openings and productivity at incumbent plants; the effects of tax and other business incentives; and enterprise zones and resident employment. On the second day, business and civic leaders discussed the need for regional collaboration, what drives innovation, and how their economic development efforts have fared. (PDF PDF icon)

2006

Universities, Innovation, and Economic Growth: Synopsis


This conference convened academics, angel networks, business leaders, civic and community officials, county and state economic development leaders, law firm representatives, legislators, public policy officials, researchers, and venture financing bankers to examine how universities, innovation, and the economy are not separate entities, but engaged participants working toward a common goal—stimulating economic growth. Experts from across the country tackled tough questions: How do universities contribute to local innovation and economic growth processes? What are the real-world applications of university research and development? Is technology transfer the best way to forge this necessary collaboration between the higher-education and business communities? The first day of the conference focused on higher research and what the data gleaned means to the economy. Distinguished professors presented on topics such as how universities are faring in a competitive world and how geography impacts innovation. The second day of the conference was geared toward people in the business community. High-level executives who have faced head-on the challenges and triumphs collaboration can bring shared experiences and insights. (PDF PDF icon)

2005

Innovation in Education Conference: Proceedings


This document provides summaries of the papers presented at the conference. (PDF PDF icon)

2004

Education and Economic Development Conference: Proceedings


This document provides summaries of the papers presented at the conference. (PDF PDF icon)

Workshop on Human Capital and Education: Summary


The Workshop on Human Capital brought together new and preliminary work on many issues involving education and human capital. The organizing strategy of the workshop was to attract preliminary work so that the participants could get more actively involved in the construction of the model and the empirical implementation. One drawback of this approach, however, is that the conclusions and findings are also preliminary. The topics covered were wide-ranging. Generally, they can be classified under four categories: (1) The acquisition of education and human capital (2) University admissions policies (3) School tax/finance reform and (4) The relationship between the changing structure of the economy and the returns to educational investment. (PDF PDF icon)

Workshop on Money, Banking, and Payments: Proceedings


This document provides summaries of the papers presented at the conference. (PDF PDF icon)