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2017 Policy Summit on Housing, Human Capital, and Inequality


When

Thursday–Friday, June 22–23, 2017

Where

Cleveland, Ohio

Research Sessions

Practitioner Sessions



Thursday, June 22, 2017

Opening Address – Keynote Speaker: J.D. Vance

J.D. Vance

J.D. Vance, opening keynote speaker, is the author of the #1 New York Times bestselling book Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis. He grew up in the Rust Belt city of Middletown, Ohio, and the Appalachian town of Jackson, Kentucky. He enlisted in the Marine Corps after high school and served in Iraq. A graduate of the Ohio State University and Yale Law School, he has contributed to the National Review and has recently signed on as a CNN Political Contributor. Vance lives in Ohio with his wife and two dogs.


Plenary 1: Industrial Heartland: Rust and Renewal

Mark E. Schweitzer

Mark E. Schweitzer (moderator) is senior vice president of External Outreach and Regional Analytics at the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. He oversees the Bank’s public outreach activities and its analysis of regional economic conditions and informs and advises the Bank’s president and board of directors on regional economic developments and economic policy issues. His research focuses on the macroeconomic impact of labor market developments and the identification of factors contributing to regional economic growth. He holds an AB in economics from the University of Chicago and an MA and a PhD in economics from the University of California, Los Angeles.


Roland Anglin

Roland V. Anglin is dean of the Maxine Goodman Levin College of Urban Affairs at Cleveland State University. For more than 25 years, he has worked in the public, educational, and philanthropic sectors promoting economic and community development in and for low-income communities. He holds a BS in political science from Brooklyn College, an MS in political science from Northwestern University, and a PhD in political science from the University of Chicago.


Sean Safford

Sean Safford is director of Sciences Po’s master of public affairs program. His research is on social, economic, and technological change, particularly in mature industrial economies, and historical social network analysis. He was a lead researcher with the MIT Local Innovation Systems Project, which examined the role of universities in economic development in the United States and several countries around the world. He earned a BS in industrial and labor relations from Cornell University and a PhD in economic sociology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.


Rolf Pendall

Rolf Pendall is codirector of the Metropolitan Housing and Communities Policy Center at the Urban Institute, where he leads a team on an array of housing, community development, and economic development projects, consistent with Urban’s nonpartisan, evidence-based approach to economic and social policy. His research expertise includes metropolitan growth trends; land-use planning and regulation; federal, state, and local affordable housing policy and programs; and racial residential segregation and the concentration of poverty. He holds a BA in sociology and anthropology from Kenyon College, an MSCRP and an MA in Latin American studies from the University of Texas at Austin, and a PhD in city and regional planning from the University of California, Berkeley.

Concurrent Session A

A1Welfare Programs and Poverty

Mary Zaki (moderator) is an assistant professor in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics at the University of Maryland. Her research focuses on household finance and consumption issues among low-income populations. She currently is studying household spending patterns between paycheck receipts, the effects of high cost credit on food consumption among military families, the influence of food acquisition costs on food stamp month spending, historical consumer credit costs, and the effect of school breakfast program expansions on health outcomes and test scores. She earned a BA and a BS in economics from the University of Pennsylvania and an MS and a PhD in economics from Northwestern University.

Leslie McGranahan is a senior economist and research advisor at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago. She joined the Chicago Fed in 1998, but spent 2000 through 2004 in the United Kingdom, where she was an economist at the University of Warwick and the Institute for Fiscal Studies. Her research interests have focused on the intersection between tax policy and household economic decisions, including consumption and debt. She holds an AB in politics from Princeton University and a PhD in economics from Northwestern University.

James P. Ziliak is the Carol Martin Gatton Endowed Chair in Microeconomics in the Department of Economics and is the founding director of the Center for Poverty Research and the Kentucky Federal Statistical Research Data Center at the University of Kentucky. His research expertise includes labor economics, poverty, food insecurity, and tax and transfer policy. He has published widely in leading economics journals. He earned a BS and a BA in economics and sociology from Purdue University and a PhD in economics from Indiana University.

Chloe Gibbs is an assistant professor of economics at the University of Notre Dame, where she is also a faculty affiliate of the Wilson Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities and the Institute for Educational Initiatives. She is interested in measuring the effects of policies and programs targeted at disadvantaged children and families. Her recent research includes analyzing the impacts of full-day kindergarten on both its participants and maternal employment, exploring the “fade out” of early childhood intervention effects, and investigating the intergenerational transmission of Head Start effects. She holds a BA in government and international studies from the University of Notre Dame, an MPP from the University of Michigan, and a PhD from the University of Chicago.

A2Entrepreneurship and the Industrial Heartland

Rubén Hernández-Murillo (moderator) is a senior policy economist in External Outreach and Regional Analytics at the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. His primary research interests include public economics, regional and urban economics, and real estate economics. His research has appeared in the Journal of Banking and Finance, the Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, among others. He holds a BA in economics from Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México and an MA and a PhD in economics from the University of Rochester.

Emin Dinlersoz is a principal economist in the Center for Economic Studies at the United States Census Bureau. Prior to joining the Census Bureau, he taught in the economics department at the University of Houston. His research broadly focuses on firm and industry dynamics, regional and urban economics, and industrial and labor relations. His most recent work investigates the connection between automation and productivity, the effects of technological change on unions, and the patterns of leverage and financing over the life-cycle of firms. He earned a BS in industrial engineering from Bilkent Üniversitesi and a PhD in economics from the University of Rochester.

Mark Partridge is the C. William Swank Chair of Rural-Urban Policy and a professor in the Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics at The Ohio State University. He is an expert in community and regional economics and rural-urban spatial modeling, and his current research interests include investigating regional economic growth, urban spillovers on rural economies, the reasons regions grow at different rates, and spatial differences in income equality and poverty. He earned a BA in economics from the University of Montana, an MA in economics from the University of Wyoming, and a PhD in economics from the University of Illinois.

Stephanie Johnson is a PhD candidate in the Department of Economics at Northwestern University. Her research interests include household finance, banking, and financial regulation. She is currently studying how mortgage market regulation affects self-employment and small-business formation. Before starting her graduate studies, she was an analyst in the Financial Stability Department of the Reserve Bank of Australia. She holds a bachelor of economics with honors from the University of Tasmania.

A3The Opioid Crisis

Kyle Fee (moderator) is a regional community development advisor in the Community Development Department at the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. In this role, he conducts applied research and outreach related to economic, workforce, and neighborhood development and economic geography in the region the Bank serves. He holds a BS in economics and business administration from John Carroll University and an MA in urban studies and economic development from Loyola University. He is currently pursuing a PhD from the Maxine Goodman Levin College of Urban Affairs at Cleveland State University.

Orman Hall is a public health analyst for the Ohio High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) program’s Heroin Response Strategy, for which he is responsible for assessing the scope of Ohio’s opioid addiction and evaluating treatment and law enforcement strategies. Prior to his position with the Ohio HIDTA, he served as the executive director of the Fairfield County Alcohol, Drug Addiction, and Mental Health Board; director of the Ohio Department of Alcohol and Drug Addiction Services; and manager of the specialized docket section of the Ohio Supreme Court. He earned an MA in social science from Marshall University.

Andrea Boxill is deputy director of the Governor’s Cabinet Opiate Action Team at the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services. There, she monitors service delivery, assists in writing policy, interprets federal and state laws and regulations to ensure compliance, and assists in coalition building to address the opioid epidemic throughout the state. Collaborating with behavioral healthcare professionals, social services agencies, and the legal system, she has spent 25 years serving adults, young people, and families in a variety of environments with a focus on chemical dependency and human trafficking.

William M. Denihan is the CEO of the Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services (ADAMHS) Board of Cuyahoga County. Considering himself a public servant, he has worked to improve and stabilize Ohio’s government for more than 40 years, directing agencies at the state, county, and local levels. A native Clevelander personally invested in the city, he founded Cudell Improvement, Inc., a neighborhood development corporation located on Cleveland's west side. He holds a BA in public administration from Cleveland State University.

Rahul Gupta is the West Virginia state health officer and commissioner for the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources, Bureau for Public Health. A practicing internist with 25 years of clinical experience, he also holds faculty appointments at the West Virginia University School of Public Health, the University of Charleston School of Pharmacy, and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. He holds an MPH in healthcare organization and policy from the University of Alabama at Birmingham and an MBA in innovation and technology management from the London School of Business and Finance. He earned an MD from the University of Delhi.

A4Economic Inclusion and Anchor Institutions

David Zuckerman (moderator) is manager of healthcare engagement at the Democracy Collaborative, a national research institute dedicated to developing strategies for a more democratic economy. He leads the coordination of the Healthcare Anchor Network—a health system-led collaboration focused on improving community health and well-being by building inclusive and sustainable local economies. He is the author or contributing author of several works focused on how hospitals and health systems can support community health improvement and strengthen their local economies. He holds a BA in government and politics and an MPP from the University of Maryland, College Park.

Kathryn Wertheim Hexter is director of the Center for Community Planning and Development at the Maxine Goodman Levin College of Urban Affairs and the Levin College Forum at Cleveland State University. A planner and public policy analyst, she has more than 30 years of experience managing and directing housing studies, program evaluations, research, and technical assistance projects in the areas of housing policy, community and neighborhood development, sustainable development, city and regional planning, and civic engagement. She earned an undergraduate degree from Washington University and a master’s degree in city and regional planning from Harvard University.

Sameera Fazili is a senior community and economic development visiting adviser at the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta. She is also a consultant at the Urban Institute, for which she researches financial regulation and community development. She has spent her career working in domestic and international economic development, focusing on inclusive economic growth, access to finance, and social enterprise. Her previous positions include policy work with the White House National Economic Council and the United States Department of the Treasury and lecturing at Ludwig Center for Community & Economic Development, where she helped start a CDFI, drove a local anti-foreclosure initiative, and expanded the clinic’s work to international microfinance. She earned a BA in social studies from Harvard College and a JD from Yale Law School.

Kate Sommerfeld is the corporate director of community relations, advocacy, and social determinants for ProMedica, a mission-driven, not-for-profit, nationally distinguished health care system serving northwest Ohio and southeast Michigan. She is responsible for ProMedica’s community work, addressing the social and economic factors that shape the community’s health. Prior to joining ProMedica, Sommerfeld spent seven years leading rural and urban change with United Way. She holds a BA in political science and child psychology from Purdue University and an MPA from Bowling Green State University.

Concurrent Session B

B1Challenges to Health in Urban and Rural Areas

Hal Martin (moderator) is a policy economist in the Community Development Department at the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, for which he conducts research related to tax policy and housing. His research interests include housing, urban economics, public finance, applied microeconomics, and experimental economics, and his current work focuses on the distributional impacts of tax policy on housing across income levels. He holds a BA in economics from Principia College and an MA and a PhD in economics from Georgia State University.

Randy Wykoff is the founding dean of the College of Public Health at East Tennessee State University. A physician certified in pediatrics and preventive medicine with additional training in tropical medicine, he lectures extensively on the social determinants of health and the health status of Appalachia. He began his career as the district medical director of the Upper Savannah Health District in South Carolina, and he has served Project HOPE, the United States Department of Health and Human Services, and the United States Food and Drug Administration. He earned an MD from Tulane University.

Benjamin D. Ukert is a postdoctoral researcher at the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics and the Injury Science Center at the Perelman School of Medicine. With interests in risky health behaviors, insurance reform, public transfer programs, and crime prevention, his research aims to understand how public policy changes affect health, and his current research investigates the impact of WIC participation, minimum wage, and insurance expansions on the health of the United States population. He holds a PhD in economics from Georgia State University.

Nengliang (Aaron) Yao is an assistant professor in the Department of Public Health Sciences at the University of Virginia. He is also the founding chair of AcademyHealth’s Global Health and Health Care Interest Group. His research focuses primarily on rural health and geriatric care, and he has published numerous journal articles on health and healthcare issues in rural Appalachia. He holds a BS in management from Shanghai University of Finance and Economics and a PhD in health policy and administration from Pennsylvania State University.

B2The Impacts of the Community Reinvestment Act on Residential Lending

O. Emre Ergungor (moderator) is a senior economic advisor in the Research Department at the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. He serves in the banking policy and analysis group, which conducts research on regulatory policy and banking issues and provides advice on financial policy formulation. He specializes in research related to information economics, financial stability and systemic risk analysis, and municipal finance. He earned a BS in mechanical engineering from Boğaziçi Üniversitesi and an MBA from Koç Üniversitesi. He earned a PhD in finance from the University of Michigan.

Lei Ding is an economic advisor in the Community Development Studies and Education Department at the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, for which he conducts and manages research focused on affordable housing, mortgage finance, neighborhood change, and community development. He is the author of numerous articles in economics and policy journals and has recently published on gentrification and inclusive growth. He holds a BS and an MA from Tsinghua University and a PhD in public policy from George Mason University.

Hyojung Lee is a PhD candidate in urban planning and development at the University of Southern California Sol Price School of Public Policy. His research interests include housing demography, intergenerational mobility, social inequality, urban and housing economics, household consumption, and community development. He is especially interested in studying how advantages and disadvantages are transmitted from one generation to another through housing and neighborhoods. He holds a BS in civil, urban, and geosystem engineering and an MS in civil and environmental engineering from Seoul National University and will be a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University in July.

Daniel Ringo is an economist in the Division of Research and Statistics at the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. His research interests include real estate economics, labor economics, and the economics of education. His current work focuses on policies affecting credit markets for mortgages and student loans. He earned a BA in history from Tulane University and a PhD in economics from the University of Rochester.

B3The Role and Impact of Philanthropy in Connecting Growth and Opportunity

Alicia Kitsuse (moderator) is director of the Older Industrial Cities program at the Funders’ Network for Smart Growth and Livable Communities, where she connects funders engaged in revitalizing postindustrial cities to learning opportunities, key resources, and one another. Prior to joining the Funders’ Network, she was a program officer at the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation in Flint, Michigan, where she worked on a variety of land use, community and economic development, and workforce-related projects focused on stimulating growth and revitalization in Flint and the surrounding region. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Smith College and an MA and PhD in urban planning from the University of Southern California.

Will Lambe is a senior community and economic development advisor at the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta. He specializes in development finance and has written and spoken on topics such as rural development finance, public–private partnerships, tax credit finance, philanthropy, the Community Reinvestment Act, and the EB-5 immigrant investor program. Prior to joining the Atlanta Fed, he was director of community and economic development programming at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Government, where he carried out research and advised local governments on public-private partnerships to attract private investment into distressed areas. He holds a BA from the University of Colorado Boulder and an MPP from Duke University.

Susan Longworth is a senior business economist in the Community Development and Policy Studies Division at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago. Prior to joining the Chicago Fed in 2011, she had more than 20 years of community development experience, with a special emphasis on community development financial institutions and community banks. She holds a BA in English from the University of Michigan, an MS in public service management from DePaul University, and an international MBA from the University of Chicago.

Carolyn Saxton is president and CEO of Legacy Foundation, a community foundation and the leading philanthropic partner serving Lake County, Indiana. Prior to her position with Legacy Foundation, she was the executive director of Lubeznik Center for the Arts in Michigan City, Indiana, where she was recognized for her role in incorporating the arts into downtown redevelopment and bringing Artspace Uptown Artist Lofts to Michigan City. She holds a BA in sociology from West Virginia Wesleyan College.

B4Putting People to Work in High-Demand, High-Growth Sectors

Stefani Pashman (moderator) is CEO of Partner4Work, a nonprofit organization that bridges the gap between jobseekers and companies in need of talent. Prior to her position at Partner4Work, she spent many years in healthcare, led policy changes in human service programs such as Medicaid, worked in private consulting at Avalere Health and Navigant, and served as an analyst at the White House’s Office of Management and Budget. She holds a BA in political science and French from Washington University and an MBA and an MSHA from the University of Michigan.

Jill Rizika is executive director of Towards Employment, a nonprofit agency that delivers employment services to low­income individuals in Greater Cleveland through a career pathway model that also helps local businesses fill their staffing needs. Every year the agency helps more than 3,000 individuals prepare for, find, keep, or advance in a career. She has been recognized as a White House Champion of Change, has received a Pillar Award for nonprofit executive director of the year, and was named a Northeast Ohio “Smart 50” executive by Smart Business magazine. She holds a BA in political science and government from Dartmouth College and an MPA from Princeton University.

Debbi Perkul is the senior workforce development strategist at University Hospitals (UH) in Cleveland, Ohio. She leads initiatives that help employees move on to college and higher-skilled jobs within the healthcare system. Prior to her work at UH, she was the director of a nonprofit organization that concentrated on workforce development of women in nontraditional jobs. She holds a BA in international studies from Miami University, an MA in Jewish history and thought from the Laura and Alvin Siegal College of Judaic Studies, and an MEd from Cleveland State University.

Sheila Ireland is the vice president of workforce solutions at University City District, a partnership of anchor institutions, small businesses, and residents that creates opportunity and improves economic vitality and quality of life in the University City area of West Philadelphia. For more than 25 years, she has been responsible for the successful leadership of the human resources and/or training functions in the non-profit, healthcare, consulting, government, and manufacturing fields. She holds an AAS in finance from the Community College of Philadelphia, a BBA in human resources management from Temple University, and an MS in human capital development from LaSalle University.

Friday, June 23, 2017

Breakfast Panel – Storytelling through Creative Expression

Dan Moulthrop

Dan Moulthrop (moderator) is CEO of The City Club of Cleveland, a free-speech forum that convenes more than 120 public programs every year in an effort to create conversations of consequence that help democracy thrive. Prior to his current role, he was a cofounder of the Civic Commons, a social media environment designed to encourage civil civic dialogue. He has been a print, radio, and television journalist and is the founding host of the public affairs radio program Sound of Ideas. He holds a BA in education and an MJ in journalism from the University of California, Berkeley.


Jennifer Ransom

Jennifer Ransom is a manager in the Education and Museum Outreach Department at the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. Focused on meeting the needs of the education community and on teaching about economics in a fun and engaging way, she coordinates the Bank’s tour program, leads education outreach efforts, and designs the Learning Center and Money Museum exhibits. Her team worked closely with local high school students participating in a paid summer internship—the Fed Scholars program, designed to help students learn about careers, acquire professional skills, and contribute to the Bank’s education and museum outreach work—to create the Fed Scholars Story Project. She holds a BS and an MA in economics from Bowling Green State University.


Jane Golden

Jane Golden is executive director of Mural Arts Philadelphia, the nation’s largest public art program. Under her direction, the Mural Arts program has created more than 3,800 works of public art through innovative collaborations with community-based organizations, city agencies, nonprofits, schools, the private sector, and philanthropies. She is a coauthor of three books about the murals in Philadelphia and an adjunct instructor at the University of Pennsylvania and at the Moore College of Art and Design. She holds degrees in fine arts and political science from Stanford University, an MFA from Rutgers University, and honorary degrees from several institutions of higher education.


Gretchen Musicant

Gretchen Musicant is the Minneapolis health commissioner. She oversees the Minneapolis Health Department whose mission is “improve the quality of life for all people in the city by protecting the environment, preventing disease and injury, promoting healthy behaviors, and creating a city that is a healthy place to live, work and play.” Prior to working for the city, she was vice president of community health for the Minnesota Hospital Association and a government affairs specialist for the Minnesota Nurses Association. She holds a BS in nursing and an MPH from the University of Minnesota.


Plenary 2: Race and Inequality across Systems: Criminal Justice, Education, and Implications for Economic Opportunity

Douglas Blackmon

Douglas A. Blackmon is a senior fellow and the director of public programs at the University of Virginia’s Miller Center of Public Affairs, where he is executive producer and host of American Forum, a public affairs program that airs on more than 200 public television affiliates across the United States. An expert in race relations, slavery, and the history of the American South, he won the Pulitzer Prize for his book Slavery by Another Name: The Re-Enslavement of Black Americans from the Civil War to World War II. He earned a BA in English from Hendrix College.


Elizabeth Oltmans Ananat

Elizabeth Oltmans Ananat is an associate professor of public policy studies and economics at the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University and a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Her research focuses on the intergenerational dynamics of poverty and inequality and includes topics such as the effects of residential segregation on cities, the effects of job destruction on inequality, and the causes of the black–white wage gap. She holds a BA in political economy and mathematics from Williams College, an MPP from the University of Michigan, and a PhD in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.


Derrick Darby

Derrick Darby is a professor of philosophy at the University of Michigan. An expert on race, inequality, and social justice, he has collaborated with scholars in economics, sociology, psychology, history, and law on projects that examine how equity-based public policy can better address racial disparities in education and other areas. He holds a BA in philosophy from Colgate University and a PhD in philosophy from the University of Pittsburgh.


Mark Singer

Mark I. Singer is the Leonard W. Mayo Professor of Family and Child Welfare at the Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences and deputy director of the Begun Center for Violence Prevention Research and Education at Case Western Reserve University. He began his career as a welfare investigator in Brooklyn, New York, and has more than 45 years of experience in social services. A current member of the Cuyahoga County Metropolitan Housing Authority Police Department and former instructor in the Cleveland Police Academy, he works with law enforcement to establish links between police officers and social services. He holds a BA in philosophy from Baldwin Wallace College and an MSSA and a PhD from Case Western Reserve University.


Concurrent Session C

C1Municipalities with Falling Revenues

Lee Fisher (moderator) is dean of Cleveland State University’s Cleveland–Marshall College of Law. Among a diverse career spanning the private, public, nonprofit and academic sectors, he is most widely known for his extensive public service, having served as Attorney General of Ohio and as Lieutenant Governor of Ohio. Prior to those terms, he spent eight years as an Ohio State Senator and two years as an Ohio State Representative. He earned a BA from Oberlin College and an MNO and a JD from Case Western Reserve University.

Howard Chernick is a professor of economics and a member of the doctoral faculty at Hunter College in the City University of New York. His research specializes in the economics of the public sector, with special attention to the distributional impacts of government spending and taxation. He has published widely on fiscal federalism, urban public finance, and antipoverty policy. He earned a BA in economics from Johns Hopkins University and a PhD in economics from the University of Pennsylvania.

William Fox is a chancellor’s professor, a Distinguished Professor of Business, and director of the Boyd Center for Business and Economic Research at the University of Tennessee. He has served as a consultant in more than 40 countries and 15 states within the United States on a range of public policy issues, and he has held visiting appointments as a professor at the University of Hawaii, a scholar at the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, and a Distinguished Fulbright Chair at the Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main. His current research is focused on improving tax structures and tax policies and enhancing regional economic development. He holds a BA from Miami University and an MA and a PhD from The Ohio State University.

Mark Skidmore is a professor of economics at Michigan State University, where he holds the Morris Chair in State and Local Government Finance and Policy in the Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics. He also serves as director of the North Central Regional Center for Rural Development. His recent research areas include economics of the public sector, economic development, and the economics of natural disasters. He holds a BA in economics from the University of Washington and a PhD in economics from the University of Colorado.

C2Housing Subsidies and Child Outcomes

Dionissi Aliprantis (moderator) is a research economist in the Research Department at the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. He is primarily interested in growth, applied econometrics, labor and urban economics, and education, and his current research investigates neighborhood effects on education and labor market outcomes. He serves as associate director of Math Corps Cleveland and is a key collaborator on its National Science Foundation grant for advancing informal STEM learning. He earned BA degrees in economics and Spanish and a BS in mathematics from Indiana University, and he holds a PhD in economics from the University of Pennsylvania.

Eric Chyn is an assistant professor in the Department of Economics at the University of Virginia and a faculty research fellow at the Rhode Island Innovative Policy Lab at Brown University. His primary research fields are labor and public economics. In his recent work, he studies the effects of government programs on long-run outcomes of children. His latest research suggests there are significant benefits from relocating children from public housing using vouchers. He holds a PhD in economics from the University of Michigan, where he was also a trainee in the Population Studies Center.

Daniel Hartley is a policy economist in the Research Department at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago. His primary research interests include insurance, urban economics, and labor economics, and his current work focuses on neighborhood housing market dynamics, crime, public housing, and the insurance industry. Prior to working at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, he was an economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. He holds a BS in electrical engineering and an SM in electrical engineering and computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, an MBA from the University of Chicago, and a PhD in economics from the University of California, Berkeley.

Keren Horn is an assistant professor in the Department of Economics at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. She is an expert in urban economics, housing economics, the economics of education, affordable housing policy, and residential and school choice. Her research seeks to inform policies that will help cities become places of opportunity for people at both ends of the socio-economic spectrum, with a particular focus on increasing access to opportunity for low-income children. She holds a BA in psychology from the University of Pennsylvania and an MUP and a PhD in public policy from New York University.

C3Fintech Lenders and Their Potential to Reach Underserved Women- and Minority-Owned Small Businesses

Barbara J. Lipman (moderator) is a project manager in the Division of Consumer and Community Affairs of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, for which she analyzes emerging issues in consumer and small-business financial services. She conducts qualitative and quantitative research on loan products from the perspective of “mom and pop” small business borrowers. She has more than 15 years of experience in community development and has served as a consultant to the World Bank, Habitat for Humanity, and the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development. She holds a BA in economics from the University of Pennsylvania and an MSc in urban planning from the London School of Economics and Political Science.

Joyce Klein is director of FIELD (the Fund for Innovation, Effectiveness, Learning and Dissemination) at the Aspen Institute, which advances business ownership as an economic opportunity strategy. She has more than 25 years of experience studying and supporting microenterprise and entrepreneurial development programs in the United States. She has also designed and managed grant programs aimed at supporting innovation in the practice of microenterprise development in the United States. She holds a BA in economics from Boston College and an MPP from the University of California, Berkeley.

Carrie Rosenfelt serves as the executive director of the northern Ohio region of the Economic Community Development Institute (ECDI), a nonprofit organization and United States Treasury-certified community development financial institution that provides training, coaching, and access to capital to help historically underserved entrepreneurs start and grow businesses. She holds a BA in English from the University of Maryland at College Park, and she is a graduate of the Diversity Center of Northeast Ohio’s LeadDIVERSITY program, the Cleveland Leadership Center’s Cleveland Bridge Builders Program, and the German Marshall Fellowship program.

Ingrid Gorman is the research director at the Association for Enterprise Opportunity (AEO), an organization that creates economic opportunity for underserved entrepreneurs. She has more than 30 years of experience in data analysis and modeling and qualitative and quantitative research design. Prior to her role at AEO, she served at Discovery Communications, where she spent more than 22 years in branding research, product testing, forecasting, strategic planning, and corporate research. She holds a BA in economics, math, and computer science from Youngstown State University and an MA in theology from St. Mary’s Seminary and University.

C4Regional Food Systems

Andrew Dumont (moderator) is a senior community development analyst at the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, where he leads the Board’s work on rural development, affordable housing, and other place-conscious community and economic development policy. Prior to joining the Board, he worked at Pathway Lending—a community development financial institution serving Tennessee and Alabama—structuring and underwriting small-business loans, providing technical assistance to lending clients, and furthering the development of new lending programs. He holds a bachelor’s degree in registered accounting and financial analysis from the State University of New York’s University at Buffalo and a master’s degree in public policy, international economics, and financial markets from The George Washington University.

Debra Tropp is the deputy director of the Marketing Services Division of the United States Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Marketing Service, where she oversees the Division’s applied research and technical assistance work on local food-system development. Much of her work during the past two decades has focused on identifying marketing opportunities for locally produced food in institutional and commercial channels and tracking the evolution and development of business models that seek to facilitate cost-effective local food distribution. She holds an AB in political science from Bryn Mawr College and an MIA in economic and political development from Columbia University.

Becca Jablonski is an assistant professor and food systems extension economist in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics at Colorado State University, where she facilitates the Colorado Food Systems Advisory Council and is a coleader of the university’s food systems extension team. Her research and extension efforts focus on understanding processes of rural and regional development, with an emphasis on identifying strategies to support entrepreneurship, improve agribusiness performance, and enhance regional food systems. She holds a BA in history from Cornell University, an MS in development studies from the University of London, and a PhD in city and regional planning from Cornell University.

Bill McKinney is director of research and evaluation for The Food Trust, a nationally recognized nonprofit dedicated to ensuring everyone has access to affordable, nutritious food and information to make healthy decisions. He has more than 20 years of experience working in nonprofit, academic, and private settings as a researcher, evaluator, planner, administrator, and program developer. His work has focused on food access, nutrition education, public health, violence, young people, education, mentoring programs, community development, reentry, and adjudicated youth. He holds a master’s degree in applied anthropology from the University of Maryland and a PhD in anthropology from Temple University.

Closing Address – Keynote Speaker: Loretta J. Mester

Loretta J. Mester

Loretta J. Mester, closing keynote speaker, is president and chief executive officer of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. She participates in the formulation of US monetary policy and oversees 950 employees in Cleveland, Cincinnati, and Pittsburgh. Prior to assuming her current role in 2014, she was executive vice president and director of research at the Philadelphia Fed, having joined the Bank as an economist in 1985. She has published numerous journal articles on a variety of topics, including economics, central banking, and financial issues. She also serves as managing editor of the International Journal of Central Banking and as coeditor of the Journal of Financial Services Research. She is a director of the Greater Cleveland Partnership, a trustee of the Cleveland Clinic, and a trustee of the Musical Arts Association (Cleveland Orchestra). She holds a BA in mathematics and economics from Barnard College and an MA and a PhD in economics from Princeton University.


Sponsored by the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland in partnership with the Federal Reserve Banks of Philadelphia and Minneapolis.

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