Daniel Kolliner |

Research Analyst


Daniel Kolliner, Research Analyst

Daniel Kolliner is a research analyst in the Research Department of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. His primary interests include urban economics, banking, and economic history.

Born in Hudson, Ohio, Mr. Kolliner is a graduate of Oberlin College and holds a BA in economics and history.

  • Fed Publications
Title Date Publication Author(s) Type

 

August, 2014 Daniel Kolliner; Yuliya Demyanyk; Economic Trends
Abstract: Peer-to-peer lending—a type of lending which matches individual borrowers with investors—is a recent innovation. But because it fills at least two gaps left by traditional lending sources, the peer-to-peer-lending market is likely to continue growing for some time.

top

 

July, 2014 Daniel Kolliner; Daniel Hartley; Economic Trends
Abstract: During the housing boom, a number of large cities in the United States experienced redevelopment in their lower-income neighborhoods as higher-income residents moved in, a process known as gentrification. Looser lending standards, which were prevalent at the time, may have contributed to the trend. Since lending standards have tightened with the onset of the housing bust and the financial crisis, we wondered whether gentrification has continued after the recession in places where it was happening before.

top

 

July, 2014 Daniel Kolliner; Ozgur Emre Ergungor; Economic Trends
Abstract: By most accounts, household deleveraging appears to be over. Auto and student loans have been strong throughout the recovery, and mortgage lending is beginning to turn the corner. But using data adjusted for inflation, consumer credit appears weaker. Looking at the mortgage market, those with strong credit scores appear to be benefiting the most from current low borrowing costs. However, everyone appears to be benefiting from the auto loan boom.

top

 

May, 2014 Daniel Kolliner; Ozgur Emre Ergungor; Economic Trends
Abstract: Household debt began to shrink in early 2009 and dropped by nearly $1.4 trillion before bottoming out in mid-2013. Household debt has increased in back-to-back quarters for the first time since 2008, with mortgages accounting for 63 percent of the increase. Will we see continued improvement in the real estate market? Going forward, mortgage lending may face stronger headwinds if mortgage rates continue to rise.

top

 

March, 2014 Daniel Kolliner; Yuliya Demyanyk; Economic Trends
Abstract: During the last recession, the aggregate level of household credit began to fall, raising concerns about the prospects for the recovery. The decline suggested that consumers could be scaling back their demands for credit and lenders could be unwilling or unable to lend. Finally, in the last two quarters of 2013, the total level of outstanding household credit has begun to rebound. But even though household credit has risen, the debt burden has not.

top

 

January, 2014 Daniel Kolliner; Ozgur Emre Ergungor; Economic Trends
Abstract: During the Great Recession, household wealth fell nearly 20 percent. Due to the sluggish growth of the economy, it took five years for households to recover the lost ground. Since 2011, the growth of household assets and net worth has been on a strong upward trend. Should we worry about this trend, given that the Great Recession was preceded by a similar boom in household assets? We don't think so. Unlike the pre-recession period, the current growth in assets is not carried on the shoulders of overextended consumers who are racking up substantial debt.

top