Emily Burgen |

(Former) Research Analyst


Emily Burgen, (Former) Research Analyst

Emily Burgen is a former research analyst in the Research Department of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.

  • Fed Publications
Title Date Publication Author(s) Type

 

August, 2012 ; Murat Tasci; Economic Trends
Abstract: The unemployment rate has been above 8 percent since February 2009, the longest stretch since the 1950s. But what stands out about the current recovery’s labor market, beyond the stubbornly high unemployment rate, is the pervasiveness of long-term unemployment. This post describes this problem in detail and explores how it might be related to the persistently high unemployment rate.

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August, 2012 ; Yuliya Demyanyk; Matthew Koepke; Economic Trends
Abstract: Since the financial crisis in late 2008, the level of total real consumer credit outstanding has fallen 4.5 percent. While it has recaptured some of the ground it lost during the recession, growth has not been equally split between revolving and nonrevolving credit, its two components. In fact, while nonrevolving consumer credit has expanded past its pre-financial crisis levels, revolving credit has declined through the economic recovery.

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May, 2012 ; Dionissi Aliprantis; Economic Trends
Abstract: Many analysts have tried to understand why the pace of job growth has been so slow since the end of the Great Recession. This issue has focused attention recently on the hiring behavior of small businesses during the recovery. It turns out that simply measuring the hiring practices of small businesses can be difficult.

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April, 2012 ; Brent Meyer; Murat Tasci; Economic Trends
Abstract: The slow pace of GDP growth has some people wondering how sustainable the recent improvement in the labor market is. Implicit in their suspicion is the idea of Okun's law, which is essentially an empirical relationship between the growth rate in real GDP and changes in the unemployment rate. But looking at this relationship in a few ways, we find that the labor market is improving at a rate consistent with the rate of recovery in GDP.

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February, 2012 ; Murat Tasci; Economic Trends
Abstract: The Great Recession caused establishments of all sizes to make significant cuts in their employment. To get a picture of those losses, we turn to the Business Employment Dynamics (BED) data collected by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). BED data provides gross job gains and losses at the establishment level going back to the early 1990s and breaks down the data to several size categories. We aggregate those categories into three classes to simplify our analysis: small firms (1-49 employees), medium size firms (50-499), and large firms (500 and more employees).

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