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Inflation Central :: Inflation-Related Articles

 
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Title Date Publication Author(s)
The curiously different inflation perspectives of men and women
Nov-01-2001 Economic Commentary Bryan, Michael F./Venkatu, Guhan
Abstract:
That men and women occasionally see things differently is not a remarkable observation. But that the sexes could report vastly different perspectives on the rate at which prices are rising over a long period of time is astonishing. This Commentary describes the difference in inflation sentiment held by men and women - a puzzle that may hold the key to interpreting survey-based data on household inflation expectations.

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The demographics of inflation opinion surveys
Oct-15-2001 Economic Commentary Bryan, Michael F./Venkatu, Guhan
Abstract:
In this Commentary, we document that people report very different perceptions and predictions of inflation depending upon their income, education, age, race, and gender - a strange finding that may provide an important clue to understanding how to interpret survey data of inflation expectations.

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On the cost of inflation
May-15-2001 Economic Commentary Gomme, Paul
Abstract:
The FOMC has two objectives: maximizing sustainable economic growth and maintaining price stability. At times-like the past year-these goals appear to be in conflict. This Commentary outlines some economic theory that suggests that in the long run, the FOMC can achieve its two objectives by focusing primarily on its price stability target.

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Gold prices
Mar-01-1998 Economic Commentary Haubrich, Joseph G.
Abstract:
The price of gold commands attention because it serves as an indicator of general price stability or inflation. But gold is also a commodity, used in jewelry and by industry, so demand and supply affect its pricing and need to be considered when gold is a factor in monetary policy decisions.

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Canada's money targeting experiment
Feb-01-1998 Economic Commentary Carlson, John B.
Abstract:
An inquiry into why the Bank of Canada was unable to bridle the inflation of the 1970s by controlling money growth.

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On the origin and evolution of the word inflation
Oct-15-1997 Economic Commentary Bryan, Michael F.
Abstract:
A historical look at the origin and uses of the word inflation, arguing that although the term has become nearly synonymous with "price increase," its original meaning--a rise in the general price level caused by an imbalance between the quantity of money and trade needs--is the definition driving many of those who advocate an anti-inflation policy for the Federal Reserve.

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Bad standards
Oct-01-1997 Economic Commentary Bryan, Michael F.
Abstract:
An argument that what is essential in any arbitrary measure--including measures of value--is that they can be counted on to convey accurate and consistent information. When a central bank tolerates inflation, it reduces an economy's ability to make decisions based on value.

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TIPS for safer investing
Jul-01-1997 Economic Commentary Sargent, Kevin H./Taylor, Richard D.
Abstract:
A look at some of the advantages and disadvantages of Treasury Inflation-Protection Securities, the first U.S. government securities guaranteed to provide riskless, long-term protection against inflation, covering their structure, expected performance against traditional Treasury securities, liquidity concerns, and the claim that they will allow the Treasury to reduce its borrowing costs.

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Median price changes: an alternative approach to measuring current monetary inflation
Dec-01-1991 Economic Commentary Bryan, Michael F./Pike, Christopher J.
Abstract:
To measure inflation accurately, one must distinguish between relative price movements and inflation, a rise in the underlying level of all price changes. The CPI, the most popular indicator of the current rate of inflation, does not discriminate between the two. This Commentary discusses the limitations of mean prices statistics as inflation indicators and suggests a well-defined and easily computed alternative--median price changes--as a better signal of current monetary inflation.

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