2013 Policy Summit on Housing, Human Capital, and Inequality

September 19-20, 2013
InterContinental Hotel & Conference Center
Cleveland, Ohio

Bios Summary [pdf]

Manuel Adelino is an assistant professor of finance at Duke University's Fuqua School of Business. He conducts research on household, corporate, and real estate finance. His current work focuses on the effect of access to collateral on new business creation and on the effects of the supply of mortgage credit on house prices. Previously, he worked as a business analyst in the Lisbon office of McKinsey and Company. Adelino received a PhD in financial economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Sloan School of Management.

Bryan Ashton serves as senior program coordinator at the Student Wellness Center at The Ohio State University, overseeing financial education and outreach, gambling prevention education, the Wellness Ambassador team, as well as prescription drug and men's sexual violence initiatives. Additionally, he supports holistic wellness programming and assessment efforts. Ashton earned a BS in business administration with a specialization in accounting from The Ohio State University.

Robert Avery is the project director of the National Mortgage Database at the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA). He joined the FHFA after retiring as a senior economist from the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. Previously, he was a professor at Cornell University and an assistant professor at Carnegie Mellon University. Avery is one of the founders of the tri-annual Survey of Consumer Finances and designed the loan sampling systems used for the Federal Reserve's examinations of small bank safety and soundness and for large syndicated loans. He heads a new inter-agency effort at the FHFA designed to create a comprehensive residential mortgage database to better serve supervisory and policy concerns. Avery holds a BA from the University of Pennsylvania and a PhD from the University of Wisconsin.

Nadine Ballard is an associate professor in the Paralegal Department at Sinclair Community College. Previously, she served for 15 years as a magistrate in the General Division of the Montgomery County Court of Common Pleas in Dayton, Ohio. She has been a licensed attorney in Ohio since 1980, having served six different attorneys general in the Consumer Protection Section of the Ohio Attorney General's office. In 2009, she served as the consumer protection fellow for the National Association of Attorneys General in Washington, DC. Ballard is an annual contributor to Westlaw's Ohio Consumer Law Manual. She holds a BS in public affairs management with a concentration in consumerism from Michigan State University and a JD from the University of Dayton.

Ty Barksdale is vice president of business banking for Northeast Ohio at Sutton Bank. Previously, he held positions with a large regional bank as well as several community banks. Over the years, Barksdale has presented on topics relating to banking and finance to students, fellow bankers, and professionals in related fields. He has extensive knowledge and experience in government-guaranteed lending programs. Barksdale sits on the boards of several nonprofits, including Leadership Portage County and Children's Advantage. He is also a member of the Kent Rotary Club. Barksdale earned a bachelor's degree in economics and mathematics at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia.

Michael Barr is a professor of law at the University of Michigan (UM) Law School and is also a professor of public policy at UM's Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy. In 2009, he served as the assistant secretary for financial institutions with the US Department of the Treasury and was a key architect of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act. Barr conducts large-scale empirical research regarding financial services and financial regulation. Previously, he served as Treasury Secretary Robert E. Rubin's special assistant, as special advisor to President William J. Clinton, and as a law clerk to US Supreme Court Justice David H. Souter. He received a JD from Yale Law School, a master's degree in international relations from Magdalen College, Oxford University, and a BA in history from Yale University.

Greg Bell is the consumer compliance banking supervisor for the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland and is responsible for oversight of all consumer compliance, fair lending, and CRA examinations of state member banks in the Fourth District. Bell is a certified regulatory compliance manager. In addition to his 18 years of compliance examination experience with the Federal Reserve, he was a compliance, CRA, and BSA officer for two financial institutions. Bell earned a BS in business administration from Southeast Missouri State University.

Ken Benton is a senior consumer regulations specialist at the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia. He is the editor of Consumer Compliance Outlook, a Federal Reserve System outreach publication focusing on federal consumer protection laws and regulations. Prior to his current role, he practiced law in the Philadelphia area with particular expertise in consumer and commercial bankruptcies, commercial litigation, appeals, and trademarks. He has successfully argued appeals in federal and state appellate courts, including victories in the Pennsylvania Supreme Court and the Third Circuit Court of Appeals. Benton holds a bachelor's degree in finance from Indiana University in Bloomington and a JD from Tulane University Law School.

Meta Brown is a senior economist in the Research and Statistics Group of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. She is an applied microeconomist studying labor markets and households' consumption and investment choices, particularly consumer debt, job referrals and search, human capital investment, and late-life asset decumulation and bequests. Prior to joining the New York Fed, Brown was an assistant professor at the University of Wisconsin. She earned a BA in English and economics from The Ohio State University and holds a PhD from New York University.

Shelly Callahan is the executive director of the Mohawk Valley Resource Center for Refugees (MVRCR). She has served in a variety of roles at MVRCR, including employment manager, multi-cultural services director, and senior director of programs and services. In her current role, she oversees management of the agency, which promotes the well-being of culturally diverse individuals and families by welcoming refugees and immigrants and providing individual and community-centered activities designed to create opportunity and facilitate understanding. She worked for more than a decade in Washington, DC, as a legal editor and worked for four years at the Supreme Court of the United States in the Office of Reporter of Decisions' Office. Callahan received her BA from the University at Buffalo, the State University of New York.

Diane Minunni Callan is vice president, Regulatory Information Services for TD Bank, where she oversees regulatory change for TD Bank. Callan has previously held positions within various TD entities overseeing compliance, anti-money laundering and CRA compliance. Prior to joining TD, she was an examiner with the Office of Thrift Supervision. Callan, a certified regulatory compliance manager and anti-money laundering specialist, earned a bachelor's degree in finance from the State University of New York College at Fredonia.

Anita Campbell is chief executive officer of Small Business Trends LLC, a media and information company. A lawyer by trade, she has worked in the banking, information technology, human resources, marketing, and e-commerce industries. Previously, Campbell was a senior vice president at Bell & Howell Company and served as chief executive officer to its subsidiary, MotorcycleWorld.com Inc. She also served as vice chair and advisory board member to the University of Akron's Center for Information Technology and eBusiness. Campbell holds a BA in English from Duquesne University and a JD from the University of Akron School of Law.

Sarah Davies is senior vice president of analytics, product management, and research at VantageScore Solutions LLC, a company launched by the three national credit reporting companies to provide credit grantors a highly predictive credit scoring model. There, she leads a team of scientists responsible for developing research and analytics on relevant market trends and topics. Additionally, Davies is responsible for the annual revalidation of the algorithms underlying the VantageScore model. Previously, she was senior vice president of product and marketing at Advanta Financial Services. Davies also served as executive vice president of marketing services at Bank One's Credit Card Division and was a principal at American Airlines' Sabre Decision Technologies. She earned undergraduate and graduate degrees in operations research and statistics from the University of Wales and Iowa State University, respectively.

Wenhua Di is a senior economist in the Community Development Department of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas. Her current research interests include consumer finance, housing economics, and program evaluation. Prior to joining the Dallas Fed, she was a visiting assistant professor at the University of Texas at Dallas. She has also consulted with the World Bank. Di holds a PhD in public policy with a concentration in environmental economics from Harvard University and an MS and a BS from Peking University.

Lei Ding is a community development economic advisor in the Community Development Studies and Education Department of the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia. His research interests include housing and mortgage finance, community and economic development, and statistical and spatial modeling. Prior to joining the Philadelphia Fed, he was an assistant professor in the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at Wayne State University. He was also a senior research associate at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Ding earned a bachelor's degree from Tsinghua University and a PhD in public policy from George Mason University.

Sean Dobson is chief executive officer and chairman at Amherst Holdings, an investment services company dedicated to US real estate finance. Dobson has over 25 years of experience in the mortgage industry, has served as a board member of the American Securitization Forum, and has counseled various branches of the federal government including the Department of Treasury, the Senate, the House of Representatives, the Federal Housing Finance Agency, the Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Council of Economic Advisors, and the National Economic Advisor on housing and mortgage related issues. Dobson is co-founder, chief executive officer and chairman of the board at CapCityKids in Austin, Texas. He also currently serves as a governing trustee for the Dana-Farber Cancer Center in Boston.

Kristen Donoghue is the assistant deputy director for policy and strategy in the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's (CFPB) Office of Enforcement. Prior to her current role at CFPB, she was an assistant litigation deputy and an enforcement attorney. Previously, Donoghue practiced law at a large firm in Washington, DC. She also served as an adjunct professor in the Civil Practice Clinic at American University's Washington College of Law and as a judicial clerk to Judge Fred Parker on the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. She holds a BA from Georgetown University and a JD from the University of Michigan Law School.

Justin Draeger is president and chief executive officer of the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (NASFAA), where he serves as the organization's primary voice and as a liaison between association members, the US Congress, federal agencies, and the media. Prior to his appointment as president, he was vice president of public policy, advocacy, and research, as well the associate director of NASFAA. Previously, Draeger worked as a lead regulatory analyst for the Michigan Guaranty. He serves on the Boards of Directors of Baker College and the Association Mutual Health Insurance Corporation. He earned a BS in resource management from Brigham Young University and an MBA from Baker College.

Timothy Dunne is a research economist and policy advisor at the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta. Prior to joining the Atlanta Fed, he was a vice president in the Research Department of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland and led the Regional Issues Group. Previously, he was the Chong K. Liew Professor of Economics at the University of Oklahoma. Dunne also served as the director of research in the Office of the Chief Economist at the US Bureau of the Census. Dunne earned his BA in economics and history from the College of William and Mary and his PhD in economics from Pennsylvania State University.

O. Emre Ergungor is a senior research economist in the Research Department of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. His research focuses on financial intermediation, information economics, housing policy, and credit access of low- to moderate-income households. Born in Istanbul, Turkey, Ergungor earned a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from Bogazici University and an MBA from Koc University, both in Istanbul. He earned a PhD in finance from the University of Michigan.

Ryan Gilbert is co-founder and chief executive officer of BillFloat, a credit delivery platform. Previously, he was an entrepreneur-in-residence at Venrock. He is also co-founder of PropertyBridge and has held positions with Wells Fargo Payment Services and Andersen Consulting. Gilbert has been a speaker at financial industry conferences including the CFSI Underbanked Financial Services Forum, Finovate, Money2020, NACHA Payments Conference, and South by Southwest. He has testified before the US House of Representatives' subcommittee on Financial Institutions and Consumer Credit. Gilbert was recognized by the San Francisco Business Times as one of 40 under 40 Emerging Leaders. He is a member of the State Bar of California and is also admitted to practice law in the United Kingdom and South Africa. Gilbert earned Bachelor of Commerce and Bachelor of Laws degrees from the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg.

Michael Griffin is senior vice president of corporate CRA compliance and community development asset management at KeyBank, where he focuses on building partnerships at the corporate level and in the 22 KeyBank districts. He also has a lead role in responding to community groups and shaping KeyBank positions in response to community concerns. Previously, he was responsible for KeyBank Plus, Key's program to reach the unbanked, including the bank's check cashing program. Prior to joining KeyBank, Mike was the asset manager for Cleveland Housing Network. In 2010 he was appointed to the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System's Consumer Advisory Council, where he served as the vice-chair of the Housing and Community Development Committee. Griffin received dual degrees in business administration and Spanish from Cleveland State University.

Andrew Hanson is an associate professor of economics at Marquette University. His primary interests are public finance and urban economics, and his research has examined federal housing subsidies, spatially targeted redevelopment programs, the incidence of tobacco taxation, and racial discrimination in housing markets. Hanson's work has been published in several academic outlets including the Journal of Urban Economics, National Tax Journal, Regional Science and Urban Economics, and the Journal of Regional Science. He received a BS in economics from the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh and earned a PhD in economics from Syracuse University.

Daniel Hartley is a research economist in the Research Department of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. He is primarily interested in urban and regional economics and labor economics. His current work focuses on crime, public housing, and neighborhood housing market dynamics. Hartley has an MBA in economics and finance from the University of Chicago, and an ME and a BS in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He completed his PhD at the University of California, Berkeley.

Kyle Herkenhoff is a doctoral candidate at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). He has coauthored several papers assessing the impact of mortgage market interventions on employment recoveries. His newest research, which was recently awarded UCLA's Welton Prize in Macroeconomics and the Institute of Humane Studies Dissertation Fellowship, looks at the rise of unsecured credit access among the unemployed during the mid-1980s and its role in jobless recoveries.

Ernie Hogan is the executive director of the Pittsburgh Community Reinvestment Group (PCRG). Previously, he held positions with Northside Leadership Conference and East Liberty Development, Inc., and was a board member of Highland Park Community Development Corporation. Throughout his career, Hogan has helped foster the development of 600 units of housing and the creation of more than 1,500 jobs. Prior to joining PCRG's staff, Hogan was a member of its board of directors and helped devise many innovative programs to target credit to low-income and minority communities. In 2006, Hogan was the recipient of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette's Community Champion Award. He is a licensed realtor and holds a BA in business administration and economic finance management from the University at Buffalo, the State University of New York.

Paul Kaboth is vice president of the Community Development Department of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. His responsibilities include strategic oversight of the department's work on a range of consumer credit, community reinvestment, and asset-building issues with the Bank's Research, Policy, and Supervision and Regulation Departments. He also directs research, outreach, and public programs that promote fair and equal access to credit in the Fourth Federal Reserve District. Kaboth began his career with the Bank in 1986 as a bank examiner. Prior to assuming his current role, he held oversight responsibility for specialty examinations related to risk management in the areas of credit, markets and liquidity, operations, and corporate compliance. Kaboth holds a bachelor's degree in business administration from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio.

Scott Karol is director of program evaluation and technology at Clarifi. Prior to joining Clarifi, Karol developed client data systems and quality initiatives for Women Against Abuse. He was also a research assistant with the John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development at Rutgers University's Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, and an Eagleton Research fellow with the New Jersey Legislature's Office of Legislative Services. Karol holds an MSW with a specialization in nonprofit and public management from Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, and a BA in American studies from Pennsylvania State University.

Daniel Kreisman is a postdoctoral research fellow with the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy's Education Policy Initiative at the University of Michigan. His research focuses on education policy, labor economics, education finance, and the economics of education. In recent work, he explores the impact of philanthropic investments on racial inequality in Southern schooling. Previously, he worked for the University of Chicago's National Opinion Research Center and Chapin Hall. Prior to graduate school, Kreisman taught high school English in New Orleans. He has received grant and fellowship awards from the American Education Research Association and the Institute of Education Sciences. Kreisman holds a PhD in public policy from the University of Chicago and a BA in history and philosophy from Tulane University.

Rob Levy is the director of research at the Center for Financial Services Innovation (CFSI), where he oversees consumer research on financially underserved consumers and industry research on the trends and dynamics of the underbanked marketplace. Levy has spoken at the ATM, Debit and Prepaid Forum; the Assets Learning Conference; FiSCA; the Underbanked Financial Services Forum; the FDIC's Consumer Research Symposium; and the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System's Financial Literacy Seminar Series. Previously, he served as co-director of a student consulting team for a startup community bank targeting the underbanked and as a summer associate for the mortgage foreclosure task force at the Greater New Haven Community Loan Fund. Levy holds an MBA from the Yale School of Management and a bachelor's degree from the University of Pennsylvania.

Tamara Lindsay is the Director for Financial Empowerment Programs at the NYC Department of Consumer Affairs Office of Financial Empowerment (OFE). OFE administers a network of Financial Empowerment Centers providing one-on-one financial counseling; negotiates safe and affordable banking products to reach New York City's unbanked; tests innovative asset building efforts, including SaveUSA; increases access to safe and affordable tax preparation services; promotes beneficial tax credits; and protects New Yorkers with low incomes from predatory practices. She holds a bachelor's degree from Syracuse University and an MPA from Baruch University, City University of New York.

Michael Little serves as chief compliance officer for PNC Financial Services Group. He recently served as risk executive for compliance, operational risk, and credit risk processes. Previously, he served as the general auditor for PNC. Prior to joining PNC, Little was a credit specialist at the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, where he was responsible for developing and implementing strategies supporting the ongoing supervision of national banks and supervising examination teams during the performance of credit and operational examinations. He was also a designated credit instructor for the Northeast District. Little holds a BS in information systems and industrial management from Carnegie Mellon University and a JD from Seton Hall University.

Lance Lochner is a professor and the chair of the CIBC Centre for Human Capital and Productivity in the Department of Economics at the University of Western Ontario. He is also the chair of Human Capital and Productivity in the Canada Research Chair Program. Lochner's research interests are labor economics, economics of education, and economics of crime, and his research is largely devoted to the theoretical and empirical study of human capital formation throughout the lifecycle. Previously, he was an assistant professor of economics at the University of Rochester and spent a year as a W. Glenn Campbell and Rita Ricardo-Campbell National fellow at the Hoover Institution. He earned a BA in economics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a PhD in economics from the University of Chicago.

Brian Melzer is an assistant professor in the Finance Department at the Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University. His research interests include household finance, financial institutions, and financial regulation. His recent work examines the investment choices of heavily indebted homeowners and the effects of unemployment insurance on mortgage default. He has also studied the effects of pay day loans. Melzer earned bachelor's and master's degrees in philosophy from Princeton University and the University of St. Andrews, respectively. He also holds a PhD in economics from University of Chicago.

Vyacheslav Mikhed is an industry specialist in the Payment Cards Center of the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia. His research interests are household finance, consumer credit, personal bankruptcy, mortgage foreclosure, and real estate economics, and his current work explores the impacts on personal bankruptcy of income shocks, income inequality, and ease of access to the bankruptcy system. Mikhed is also examining the effect of government policies promoting lending to low-income and minority borrowers on US mortgage foreclosures. He holds a PhD in economics from the University of Alberta, an MA in economics from the Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education – Economics Institute (Czech Republic), an MA in economics from Economics Education and Research Consortium (Ukraine), and a BA in economics from the National University of Kiev-Mohyla Academy (Ukraine).

Shekar Narasimhan is managing partner at Beekman Advisors, which provides strategic advisory services in the real estate, mortgage finance, and affordable housing sectors. He previously served as managing director of the Prudential Mortgage Capital Company. Prior to that, he was chairman and chief executive officer of the WMF Group. Narasimhan is a fellow at the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University. He has served several terms on the Board of Directors of the Mortgage Bankers Association of America (MBA). Narasimhan was awarded the MBA's Fannie Mae Lifetime Achievement Award and the University of Pittsburgh's Dean H.J. Zoffer Distinguished Service Medal. He holds a BS in chemical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology and an MBA from the University of Pittsburgh's Joseph M. Katz Graduate School of Business.

Linda O'Connell is small business banking manager at Barlow Research Associates, Inc., where she manages the small business banking syndicated research program. Linda has direct client management responsibility for research interpretation and presentations to large bank clients. Prior to joining Barlow, she was director of marketing for the Independent Community Bankers of Minnesota. Previously, she held positions with Wells Fargo (formerly Norwest) and M&I (formerly National City Bank of Minneapolis). She was president of Minnesota's Bank Marketing Association. She holds a degree in business economics from the University of Minnesota and is a graduate of the ABA School of Commercial Lending.

Ruth Uwaifo Oyelere is an assistant professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology's School of Economics. She is also a research fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in Bonn, Germany, and a research affiliate at Households in Conflict Network. Her primary research interests are labor, development, education, and population economics. Oyelere's labor research is focused on group differences in entrepreneurship and possible explanations for these differences. She holds a PhD in agricultural and resource economics from the University of California, Berkeley.

Hoonsuk Park is a third-year doctoral candidate of finance at the Fisher College of Business at the Ohio State University. His research interests include household finance, corporate finance, and institutional investors. He is particularly interested in the savings decisions of households. Park has worked as an equity analyst locally and at the Export–Import Bank of Korea. He earned a BA in business administration from Korea University.

Vanessa Perry is associate professor and chair of the Marketing Department at the George Washington University School of Business. Her research on consumers in financial and housing markets, public policy, and consumer welfare has appeared in the Journal of Consumer Affairs, California Management Review, and the Journal of Public Policy and Marketing. Previously, she was a senior economist at Freddie Mac. From 2011 to 2012, she served as an expert on consumer information for the US Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Perry has also worked as a consultant to Bank of America, the National Association of Realtors, the IRS, and the US Department of Housing and Urban Development. Perry holds a BA in philosophy from American University, an MBA from Washington University in St. Louis, and a PhD from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Sandra Pianalto is president and chief executive officer of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, where she participates in the formulation of US monetary policy and oversees 1,000 employees in Cleveland, Cincinnati, and Pittsburgh who conduct economic research, supervise financial institutions, and provide payment services to commercial banks and the US government. Pianalto earned a bachelor's degree in economics from the University of Akron and an MA in economics from George Washington University. She is a graduate of the Advanced Management Program at Duke University's Fuqua School of Business and holds honorary degrees from the University of Akron, Baldwin–Wallace College, Kent State University, Ursuline College, Notre Dame College, Cleveland State University, and John Carroll University.

Edward J. Pinto is a resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI), where he specializes in housing finance and the effects of government housing policies on mortgages, foreclosures, and the availability of affordable housing for working-class families. He is currently researching policy options for rebuilding the US housing finance sector and writes AEI's monthly FHA Watch. Previously, Pinto was an executive vice president and chief credit officer for Fannie Mae. His work on the Government Mortgage Complex includes research papers submitted to the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission. Pinto holds a JD from Indiana University Maurer School of Law and a BA from the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign.

Rob Pitingolo is a research associate with the Urban Institute's Metropolitan Housing and Communities Policy Center, where he contributes to projects studying shared equity homeownership models, the foreclosure crisis, concentrated poverty, and school performance and mobility among residents in low-income neighborhoods. His work focuses both locally in Washington, DC, and in other metro areas throughout the country. Pitingolo was an author and data analyst for the 2012 Housing Discrimination Study. Previously, he was an intern at the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, studying vacancy and abandonment in urban neighborhoods in the Fourth District. Pitingolo holds a BA in economics from John Carroll University.

Benjamin Pugsley is an economist in the Macroeconomic and Monetary Studies Function of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Prior to joining the Bank, he was a lecturer at the University of Chicago. His primary research interests include growth, firm dynamics, and entrepreneurship. In particular, he studies the behavior of young and small firms and their role in aggregate economic conditions. His research on small business formation and growth has been featured in Slate, Business Week, The New Yorker, and The Wall Street Journal. Puglsey earned a PhD in economics from the University of Chicago and a BA from Columbia University.

David Reiss is a professor of law at the Brooklyn Law School. Previously, Reiss was an associate in the New York office of Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton and Garrison in its Real Estate Department, and an associate in the San Francisco office of Morrison and Foerster in its Land Use and Environmental Law Group. He was also a law clerk to Judge Timothy Lewis of the US Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. His article, "Subprime Standardization: How Rating Agencies Allow Predatory Lending to Flourish in the Secondary Mortgage Market" was named best article of 2006 on a topic dealing with consumer financial services law by the American College of Consumer Financial Services Lawyers. He received his BA from Williams College and his JD from the New York University School of Law.

C. Lockwood Reynolds is an assistant professor in the Department of Economics at Kent State University. His teaching and research interests are microeconomics, labor economics, public economics, and the economics of education, with a particular focus on access to and completion in higher education and the local effects of government policies designed to encourage economic activity. Reynolds teaches principles of microeconomics and the economics of labor markets. He also teaches managerial economics to Kent's MBA program and is a three-time winner of the Outstanding MBA Professor Award. He holds a BA in economics and Japanese from Williams College and a PhD in economics from the University of Michigan.

David Rothstein is director of resource development and public affairs at Neighborhood Housing Services of Greater Cleveland (NHSGC) and project director for the Ohio CASH Coalition. He has researched and published on asset, housing, and consumer issues. Prior to joining NHSGC, Rothstein was project director for asset building at Policy Matters Ohio, where he started the Ohio CASH Coalition. He was awarded the Distinguished Activist Award from Greater Community Shares for his work against predatory lending and a Cleveland Mover and Shaker Award by the 20/30 Professional Association. He currently serves as a research fellow with the New America Foundation and is a board member of the National Community Tax Coalition. Rothstein holds a BA in political science from John Carroll University and a master's degree in public policy from Kent State University.

Katherine Samolyk is a senior economist in the Office of Research at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB). Prior to joining the CFPB, she spent 15 years at the FDIC, where she conducted research on the determinants of banking and financial sector conditions, small business financing issues, and the implications of bank consolidation for the provision of banking services and the role of community banks. Previously, she was a visiting economist at the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System and an economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. She received her BS in economics at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee and her PhD in economics from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

David Scharfstein is the Edmund Cogswell Converse Professor of Finance and Banking at Harvard Business School. His research focuses on banking, financial distress, risk management, housing finance, venture capital, and corporate investment. Prior to his current role, he was the Dai Ichi Kangyo Professor of Management at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Sloan School of Management. Scharfstein is a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. He is also a member of the Squam Lake Working Group on Financial Regulation, a nonpartisan, nonaffiliated group of economists which offers guidance on financial regulatory reform. Scharfstein served as senior advisor to the Secretary of the US Treasury. He holds a PhD in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and an AB from Princeton University.

Michael Simkovic is an associate professor at the Seton Hall University School of Law. Prior to joining Seton Hall's faculty, he was an attorney at Davis, Polk and Wardwell, a strategy consultant at McKinsey and Company, and an Olin fellow in law and economics at Harvard Law School. His research focuses on credit market regulation and was cited in the US Congress' Joint Economic Committee report recommending sweeping reforms of the credit card industry, and by researchers at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, The New York Times, and USA Today. Simkovic earned a BA from Duke University and a JD from Harvard Law School.

Eldar Shafir is the William Stewart Tod Professor of Psychology and Public Affairs at Princeton University, and co-founder and scientific director at ideas42, a social science R&D lab. His current research focuses on decision making in contexts of poverty and on the application of behavioral research to policy. He was president of the Society for Judgment and Decision Making, and has held visiting positions at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, the Russell Sage Foundation, the Hebrew University Institute for Advanced Studies, Pompeu Fabra University in Barcelona, and Di Tella University in Buenos Aires. Recently, he was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship. In January 2012, he was appointed by President Barack Obama to the President's Advisory Council on Financial Capability. He received a BA from Brown University and a PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Lan Shi is a senior research associate with the Urban Institute's Housing Finance Research Center and is also an assistant professor in the Economics Department at the University of Washington. Previously, she was a visiting researcher and instructor at Peking University's Guanghua School of Management. Her research interests include agency theory, mortgage financing, and financial institutions and markets. Shi holds an MBA and a PhD in business economics from the University of Chicago.

Joanna Smith-Ramani is the director of scale strategies for the Doorways 2 Dreams (D2D) Fund, where she works on the expansion of successful innovation pilots. Prior to joining D2D, she was the director of the Baltimore CASH (Creating Assets, Savings, and Hope) Campaign, an asset building, tax preparation, and EITC coalition in Baltimore, Maryland. Previously, she held positions at Self Help Credit Union, ShoreBank, several Habitat for Humanity affiliates, and the Policy Development and Research Division of the US Department of Housing and Urban Development. Smith-Ramani holds a master's degree in public policy from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.

Mark Sniderman is executive vice president and chief policy officer at the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. He is responsible for guiding the Bank's economic research and community development efforts. Sniderman joined the Bank's Research Department as an economist in 1976. He assumed his current position in 2007. Sniderman served as senior economist for economic policy analysis for the US Senate Budget Committee in Washington, DC, while on leave from the Bank. He is a past president of the Cleveland Association for Business Economics. Sniderman earned a bachelor's degree from Case Western Reserve University, as well as master's and doctoral degrees in economics from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Jon Steiger is the director of the East Central Region of the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) based in Cleveland, Ohio, which covers consumer protection and education issues for Delaware, Washington, DC, Maryland, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia. Prior to becoming director, Steiger was an assistant regional director with the FTC. He was also a consumer protection litigator and an attorney in the FTC's Office of the General Counsel. Previously, he clerked for Judge Avern Cohn in the US District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan. Steiger holds a BA in philosophy from the University of Michigan and a JD from Columbia University's Law School.

Judith Steiner is executive vice president and chief risk officer of FirstMerit Corporation. She is responsible for enterprise risk management, compliance, CRA, insurance, security/fraud, and AML/BSA. Prior to assuming her current post, she served as general counsel and corporate secretary, compliance officer, and AML/BSA officer. Previously, she was an associate with Brouse McDowell in Akron, Ohio. Steiner serves as a board member of the Humane Society of Greater Akron and Archbishop Hoban High School. She is also a former member of the Boards of Trustees of HM Life Opportunity Services and Fair Housing Contact Service. Steiner holds a BA from the University of Akron and a JD from Case Western Reserve University School of Law.

Kenneth Temkin is principal of Temkin Associates and has over 20 years of experience in analyzing housing finance issues, as well as working on program evaluations and economic analyses for a variety of public, private, and nonprofit clients. Prior to establishing his firm, he was an associate at Kormendi/Gardner Partners, an investment bank located in Washington, DC. Previously, Temkin was a senior research associate at the Urban Institute. He earned his PhD in city and regional planning from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill after earning an MBA from Baruch College and a BS from New York University.

Chao Yue Tian is a research associate at the Center for Community Capital at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His work focuses on statistical research and his current projects involve modeling loan performance within competing risk hazard model frameworks. Previously, he was a teaching assistant in the Department of Economics and a research assistant at the Center for Economic Research at George Washington University. Tian received a BA in law from Dongbei University of Finance and Economics and an MA in liberal learning from Marrietta College. He holds a PhD in economics from George Washington University.

Lou Tisler is the executive director of Neighborhood Housing Services (NHS) of Greater Cleveland. Prior to joining NHS, he was the executive director of the First Suburbs Development Council. Previously, he was executive director of Westown Community Development Corporation. Tisler was selected by the American Marshall Memorial Fund for its German Marshall Fellowship program, which provides a unique opportunity for attendees from European countries and the United States to gain an in-depth understanding of societies, institutions, and people across the Atlantic. He was also named Emerging Leader of the Year by the National NeighborWorks Association, was named to Crain's Cleveland Business' Forty under 40 Program, and featured in the "One 2 Watch" column of Inside Business. Tisler holds an MBA in management and labor relations and a bachelor's degree in finance from Cleveland State University.

Joseph Tracy is an executive vice president and special advisor to the president at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. He was previously director of research. His primary research interests include housing and urban economics, as well as unions and collective bargaining. Prior to joining the New York Fed, Tracy was an associate professor at Yale University and Columbia University. He holds a BA from the University of Missouri and a PhD from the University of Chicago.

Trent Troyer serves as president and chief executive officer of First Federal Community Bank in Dover, Ohio. Previously, he was vice president and regional manager of Belmont National Bank. He presently serves on the boards of Tuscarawas County Community Improvement Corporation and the Ohio Bankers League. Troyer is also a member of the New Philadelphia Kiwanis Club, New Philadelphia City Schools Financial Advisory Committee, the Association of Ohio Commodores, and the Ohio Bankers League Government Relations Council. He holds degrees from Kent State University and Ashland University. Troyer is also a graduate of the American Bankers Association's Stonier Graduate School of Banking at Georgetown University.

Susan Wachter is the Richard B. Worley Professor of Financial Management and professor of real estate and finance at The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. She is also co-director of the Penn Institute for Urban Research and director of the Wharton GIS Lab. Wachter served as assistant secretary for policy development and research at HUD, a President-appointed and Senate-confirmed position. A former chairperson of the Wharton Real Estate Department, she served as president of the American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association and co-editor of Real Estate Economics. Wachter presently serves on a number of journals' editorial boards. In 2005, she received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association. Wachter earned bachelor's and doctoral degrees in economics from Harvard University and Boston College, respectively.

Ann Marie Wiersch is a policy analyst at the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. She joined the Bank in 1999 and worked in the Bank's Accounting and Financial Management Departments prior to her transition to a policy role in 2009. Wiersch has worked on several Federal Reserve System initiatives, including projects focused on small business issues and state and local government finance. She holds a bachelor's degree in business administration from Bowling Green State University and an MBA from Cleveland State University.

Lauren Williams is a program manager for the affordable homeownership and entrepreneurship teams at the Corporation for Enterprise Development (CFED), where she works to promote the use of high-quality manufactured housing as a key source of affordable homeownership. Williams also focuses on the Self-Employment Tax Initiative (SETI). Previously, she interned with the Danville Regional Foundation, where she worked on the foundation's initiatives in economic and community development. She also worked with the University of North Carolina School of Government's Community- Campus Partnership program. Williams holds a bachelor's degree in economics and international studies from University of North Carolina at Chapel.

Jonathan Zinman is a professor of economics at Dartmouth College, and co-founder and scientific director of the US Household Finance Initiative (USHFI) of Innovations for Poverty Action. He also serves on the inaugural Consumer Advisory Board of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and as a visiting scholar at the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia. Zinman is a member of the Behavioral Finance Forum and the Sage/Sloan Foundations Working Group on Behavioral Economics and Consumer Finance. His research focuses on household finance and behavioral economics. He works directly with financial service providers to develop and test innovations that are beneficial to both providers and their clients. Zinman holds a BA in government from Harvard University and a PhD in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Special thanks to Fifth Third Bancorp and PNC Financial Services Group Inc. for providing numerous scholarships to attend the Policy Summit to community development partners in their affiliate banks' footprint.

Research and policy

Finding a connection

In advance of each Policy Summit we issue a call for papers, aimed at eliciting the latest and most relevant research on topics we’re covering at that year’s conference. Read summaries of and policy implications for the research papers presented at the 2013 Policy Summit.

Small businesses: How are they faring post-recession?

What are the top challenges facing small business after the Great Recession? Two presenters from the Policy Summit describe demands of the current workplace, including that workers be adaptable, collaborative, agile, and entrepreneurial, in an Economic Development podcast. View the transcript or play the audio MP3.


May 12-14, 2014

Mark your calendars

Those are the dates of the 2014 Reinventing Older Communities conference, "Bridging Growth and Opportunity." The biennial conference, sponsored by the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia in partnership with the Cleveland Fed and others, will be held next May at the Loews Philadelphia Hotel. Check out highlights and a summary from the 2012 event, "Building Resilient Cities."




Sponsored by the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland and the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia