Cleveland Fed researchers say time spent by the unemployed searching for a job varies by age, gender, education; note job search patterns have changed in the aftermath of the recession

The amount of time the unemployed spend searching for jobs varies based on age, gender, and educational attainment, according to researchers at the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, who also note that job search patterns have changed in the aftermath of the Great Recession.

Looking at data from the American Time Use Survey, the researchers found, for example, that those with higher levels of educational attainment spent more time searching for a job, on average, than those with less education. For example, in the post-recession period, while 17 percent of unemployed high school dropouts spent time searching for a job, the figure was 35 percent for those holding at least a bachelor’s degree.

Job search time also varied by gender and age. Unemployed males between 20 and 50 with at least a bachelor’s degree spent much more time, on average, searching for a job after the recession than they had before it, while the average job search time decreased for comparable females. But for those over 50, the pattern was reversed; after the recession, the average job search time decreased slightly for males, but increased dramatically for females.

Read: Job Search Before and After the Great Recession